How Can CMS Solve Covid-19 Vaccine Distribution Issues?

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There are currently 34 vaccines globally carrying out human trials, according to WHO spokesperson Margaret Harris, with 142 vaccine candidates currently in the pre-clinical trial phase. And Harris emphasized the importance of safety and efficiency checks saying that phase three trials “will take much longer” in order to “see how truly protective” and safe any vaccine is. We’re not expecting to see widespread Covid-19 vaccination [for coronavirus] until the middle of next year.

The listing of any new vaccine was never going to be easy. But blockchain is undoubtedly an ‘essential’ and ‘integral’ tool in distributing Covid-19 vaccine. CMS (Chromosome)——who is always actively leading medical research and supply chain efforts around Covid-19 issues——are pushing a vaccine supply chain management platform which can give all stakeholders total visibility of vaccines at all levels and across all stages of the supply chain.  After the pneumococcal vaccines had been successfully tested with UNICEF program teams in the South Asia last year,the management platform is now even more stable and mature.

The main obstacles

From a technological point of view, the challenge is to manage the distribution of this next vaccine, from its generation anywhere in the world, to the site of application to the population. The first inhibitor to widespread rollout probably is the geographical disparity. Polio immunisations in India, for instance, took 16 years to cover the entirety of the under-five population in the country. the World Economic Forum estimates that with an approved vaccine, close to 10 billion doses will need to be in the supply chain to cover the entire global population, assuming a 20%-30% loss in transit and storage. “An ‘equitable’ supply chain which has immutable integrity of data with no single source of control is needed,” CMS argues, “Couse the political and economic machinations can be another potential roadblock, and they should be taken into consideration.”

Supply chain issues related to waste and theft are the other challenges to be confront. Nearly all kinds of vaccines must be stored and transported at specific temperatures to keep them from spoiling. Up to now, there hasn’t been a great way to track temperature increases quickly and ensure that a vaccine is still viable. So once mismanagement happens, the vaccines can be most likely to be throw away even though they are safe for use actually.

In addition, gaps in communication between manufacturers, distributors, hospitals and physicians’ offices, and the accurately or honestly of their document information or other factors can also be the obstacles to widespread rollout. And all these issues can be improved by blockchain continuously.

How Can CMS solve ?

“Efforts to build an open system to track and trace every vaccine dose accurately and transparently will be required to build a global consortium of vaccine researchers, pharmaceutical companies, manufacturers, distributors, healthcare workers and governments,” explained Christopher,the COO of CMS, “And blockchain technology allows us to tackle this issue.

Collaborate in a Secure Way

As a decentralized genetic engineering network with core capabilities in the fields of artificial intelligence, big data analysis, 5G technology and blockchain, CMS can be used to share time-stamped, tamper-proof evidence of success (or failure) of a potential vaccine. And the authenticity of the CMS blockchain ledger provides an immutable shared source of “truth” for development, so doctors and researchers can collaborate on the path toward an effective vaccine without jeopardizing a competitive advantage, and put research content on the CMS chain and easily develop collaboratively with other researchers. Use the non-tamperable feature of the blockchain to confirm the ownership of research results.

More Efficient & Equitable Distribution

“The vaccine supply chain is not so different from that of other industry. And as an openly verifiable platform with no single source of control,CMS can help ensure more efficient supply chains by using distribution ledger technology when dealing with the lots of actors, information asymmetry and various of different materials”, Says Christopher, “That means we can have common information across the more equitable supply chain to monitor the vaccines and to ensure that the vaccines are delivered on time, in a good state, and to those who control or fund a vaccine”.

Quality Control and Less Wastage

Due to supply chain losing, spoilage or other distribution issues, the loss percentage of vaccines when transition and storage happens usually. Thanks to the blockchain, a real-time digital ledger, it can be avoided to the most extent. When tracking each source and stakeholder within the supply chain, as well as each vial of vaccine, CMS can allow the health care industry to decrease the wastage percentage, and at the same time, it will enable doctors and distributors to minimize risks and problems. From controlling the temperature to ensuring the number of necessary syringes or rubber stoppers, the up-to-the-second information provided by blockchain technologies will be critical in ensuring that every patient in need will have access to a vaccine. “Though the capacity and logistics processes across countries are different, and to bring all stakeholders together on one platform is absolutely a big challenging, ” Christopher said, “we’re still confident that our CMS will soon be a key component in getting vaccines into the hands of health care workers and at-risk populations. ” 

The preparatory work of CMS Foundation is approaching the end. Once CMS platform goes online, the CMS Foundation team and board of directors will continue to develop in-depth blockchain technology, fully launch and vigorously promote medical and health services, and continue to access more users and corporate institutions. The team and the board of directors will continue to carry out the in-depth development of blockchain technology, continue to access more users and corporate institutions.

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